William R. Lindsey

Associate Professor, Religious Studies
Primary office:
785-864-5582
Smith Hall, Room 9

Religion in Japan; religion in Korea; theory and method in the study of religion; ritual; the body; gender; religion and childhood

Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh, 2003

William Lindsey's primary research interest lies in analyzing how individuals and groups in Tokugawa Japan (1600-1867) constructed and contested social identity and power along lines of ritual and symbol made available through the bricolage of Buddhism, Neo-Confucianism, kami worship, local traditions, and individual motivations.


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Scholarships | Religious Studies
Announcement of Religious Studies Scholarships, 2015-2016 Application Deadline: February 1, 2015 Scholarship Application Form (PDF) The Department of Religious Studies invites religious studies undergraduate majors and graduate students to submit applications for the appropriate scholarships for the…

Curiosity sparks KU paleontologist Chris Beard’s quest for man’s ancient cousins When he’s not scrutinizing ancient primate fossils in his KU lab, world-renowned paleontologist Chris Beard (http://bit.ly/1w3TQSj) is out stalking human evolutionary ancestors in remote corners of Libya, Turkey, China, Myanmar, Kazakhstan, Cambodia, Egypt, Tunisia, or Kenya. Beard, who came to KU as a Foundation Distinguished Professor, has a passion for being out in the middle of nowhere and making a discovery — “There’s nothing better than that. It’s fabulous.”